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Prodigy Sons

Being a son of a legend has got to be one of the toughest things for a young man. Following in their father's footsteps, they have to live up to being just as great as papa. Especially if they are playing the same sports as daddy did, people expect them to receive all those great genes a long with the lessons from their father. After all, your were born with greatness. And for those who don't live up to the hype, become a disappointment to their father in the public's eye.

Living Up to Famous Dads

But the fortunate thing about the sons is that they are blessed with the talent and resources to succeed. Some of the more notable sons would be Barry Sanders ( Barry Sanders’ son), Trey Griffey ( Ken Griffey Jr’s son), Deion Sanders Jr (Deion Sanders’ son), Nick Montana ( Joe Montana’s son), and Jeff Jordan (Michael Jordan’s son). Check out this article about Prodigy Sons.  The pressure is eminent, but all these kids want to create a name for themselves. Living in anyone’s shadow is not the best feeling. Everyone expects you to be just as perfect as the other person that you pressure yourself sometimes.

Once the legacy is continued, there is no better feeling for a father to have his name steadily being remember through his seed, and eventually his son’s seed. Continuing the family name is something that father are proud of. Heck look at the Mannings! He has two Superbowl winning sons, and one of them has a chance to win one more. The Griffey name is another one that has been around a while and will continue with Ken Griffey Jr’s son Trey Griffey.

Some advice for you prodigy sons out there. Don’t buy into the pressure! You know you are great so just go out and show it in your own way. Of course you are going to be compared to your father but don’t ignore it. Embrace it and take it as motivation to make your father proud, not pressure. Also, follow your own path. No one said that you have to play the same sport as daddy did. Find your love and what you are passionate about and pursue that to the best of your abilities. I am telling you now, I hope my son doesn’t filled pressured to play football like me. Do your own thing ( I hope he play baseball and get more guaranteed money, ha). Even if that means, you don’t wanna play any sports, be the best at whatever you want to do!

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/famous-fathers-sons-sports-a-father-day-celebration-gallery-1.53850

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2 Comments on Prodigy Sons

  1. I agree that “prodigy sons” shouldn’t feel pressured to follow in their fathers footsteps. Many times we see that the bar has been set so high that it seems nearly impossible to live up to those unfair expectations. Take Jordan and his sons. They were doomed from the beginning because their father just so happened to be the greatest basketball player of all time. I will say this though. Many times, these “prodigy sons” wouldnt be recruited the way they are if their father wasn’t who he was. I use Diddy’s son as an example. I’ve seen plenty of highlight tape on him and he seems average, maybe somewhat above average, yet these major programs are recruiting him. Why? Because his dad would become a half-billion dollar booster for the program. The world of college athletics!

    Feel free to stop by our blog ucolumns.com to talk more sports!

    • True True! Had it not been for their dad, most programs would not even look at these kids. They got the pressure of following their dad’s shadows as well as living up to the hype from the recruitment and their teammates who see if they are really good or not. But hey, the teammates shouldn’t complain either because they might get a look from some of the scouts just for being on the same team with these “prodigy kids”

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